Teachers find it easy to engage class

The students need something to find interest in

Scientist+at+work

Scientist at work

Jakayla Davis, Staff Writer

For AP Biology teacher Jamie Wiser, she worked to get face-to-face students on subject, but for Biology Pre-AP teacher Dr. Kelly Bender, she incorporated a great way to face-to-face and VLA to work together. 

In Wiser’s class, students participated in certain parts of the lesson about cell transport. Wiser had the groups of face-to-face students drop raw potatoes into different concentrations of sugar water to see how the potatoes reacted. The higher the concentration of sugar, the smaller the potato became. 

After finishing, the students waited to explain their answers.

 Freshman Lance Hutcheson is interactive with the lesson, but talkative as well. 

“ I think it will weigh around 50 mg.” he said..

In Bender’s class, all students participated. Phones weren’t being used unless as a calculator. 

F2F students were split into groups of two to four people and one or two VLA students made up the rest of the group.. 

Students jumped into the lesson on lipids, but occasionally would get off subject when working together. 

“I’ll give you about two or three minutes to finish this up.” Bender said to the class. 

Students then worked together with inside voices until further instructions. 

Hutcheson, in Wiser’s class, made bets with other students that he would get the question right. 

“You owe me $5 if I get it right,.” said Hutcheson. “

“You owe me a Ssnapple if I get it right.” said freshman Alexis Martinez retorted.

No money or drink changed hands over the good-hearted exchange.

Hutcheson and classmate Angel Garza  got off topic during class discussions. 

“We’re talking about how Trump got covid.” Garza said.

Both classes participated and were active in their assignments. Students only tended to get off topic when talking to peers or when distracted with playing games on the chromebooks. 

Students did have moments when they were fully participating. 

For example, “If Isotonic isn’t more or less it’s…?” Wiser asked. “Equal” the class said in unison.